Women in Science

Schedule --- Event Descriptions --- Past Events --- Outside Events --- Our Team

Women in Science Seminar Series

Welcome to the home page for the Women in Science Series! 

Over the next several weeks there will be lectures, interactive workshops, panels, and round table discussions on a number of gender-focused topics. Our mission is to support discussion of women in STEM: namely, the female faculty, postdocs, fellows, graduate students, and research staff of the Martinos Center. These discussions will be centered on the challenges they face in the workforce and how we can best support them. 

All are welcome! For the majority of events, attendance is not restricted to women- any and all are encouraged to attend regardless of gender identity. Feel free to bring a guest.

Please check this page often for updates to the schedule, including added seminars and changes to date/time of events! 

Mission statement and goals

Our mission is to support discussion of women in STEM, the challenges they face in our Center (and otherwise) and how we can best support them.

Our goal is targeted towards all members of the Martinos Center. We aim to:

  • support the advancement of women in our Center by creating discussion and providing resources

  • take action when needed to create a more supportive environment, change policies that hinder advancement, and improve the workplace atmosphere to make it free of bias

  • build a strong network of female faculty

  • increase visibility of our female facuty, postdocs, etc

  • empower the younger generations of scientists at Martinos

 

Organized by: Emma Boyd (Chair, Women in Science Seminar Series) with support from Allison Stevens (Faculty Development). Special thanks to all the women who have contributed their ideas and support to this series, and to Bruce Rosen & Bill Shaw for their support. Click here to learn more about our team!

If you have any questions about the event, topics you would like to see discussed during the event, or suggestions for future topics please send an email to eboyd2@mgh.harvard.edu and astevens@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu.

Location:  

Athinoula A. Martinos center for Biomedical Imaging
149 13th Street Charlestown #2301, Boston, MA 02129

Schedule

*Check this page for updates to location and time*

Spring 2019

Date Time Location Event

Thursday, March 14th

12:30pm-1:30pm Conference Room A Barriers to Women in Science
Thursday, March 21st 12:15pm-1:15pm Conference Room A

How to Respond to Sexism in the Moment

Monday, April 1st

5:00pm-6:30pm Conference Room A Viewing of 'RBG' Documentary (Ruth Bader Ginsburg)
Thursday, April 18th 12:00pm-1:00pm Conference Room A

Discussion for Men: How to be an Ally

Monday, May 6th 12:30pm-2:00pm Conference Room A

Postcard Party

Thursday, May 21st 12:00pm-2:00pm Conference Room A

Imposter Syndrome

Thursday, June 6th 12:30pm-2:00pm Conference Room A

Advocacy Day

Event Descriptions

Barriers to Women in Science

When: Thursday, March 14th from 12:30pm - 2:00pm in Conference Room A

Speakers: Maria Mody and Emma Boyd

Maria Mody is a Principal Investigator and Assistant Professor of Radiology at the MGH Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. She has a PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences and works at the intersection of speech and language deficits in autism and dyslexia using neuroimaging (MRI/DTI/MEG). More recently her research has been probing molecular and genetic mechanisms to inform potential interventions in neurodevelopmental disabilities. She is also the editor of a new book on the Neural Mechanisms of Language (2017; NY:Springer).

Emma Boyd is the Chair of the Women in Science Seminar Series (WiS) and a Research Technician in the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging (LCN). Emma founded WiS in early 2018 and is involved in all aspects of event planning and defining the future direction for this series. As part of LCN, Emma acquires, processes and analyzes ex vivo and in vivo brain MRI data for a variety of projects. She also assists with the testing, development, and teaching of FreeSurfer, a neuroimaging software tool developed by LCN.

Description: The first step to solving any problem is understanding what it is. Based on feedback gathered over past Women in Science events, we see a need to address some of the common barriers that women in science face in order to inform our collective understanding. In this lecture we will discuss the following: what obstacles stand in the way of women in science fields attaining professional success? What do members of CNY perceive to be obstacles to women in science? What can we do about them? All are encouraged to attend regardless of gender identity!

Registration is required so we can have an accurate headcount: Register Here!

"How to Respond to Sexism in the Moment"

When: Thursday, March 21st from 12:15pm - 1:15pm in Conference Room A

Speakers: Mariko Dodson and staff from Boston Mobilization

Description: In this workshop we will explore sexism as a system of oppression using experimential education. How have our lives been shaped by our identities? What role do power and privilege play in the workplace? How do you envision a world shaped along lines of gender-based justice? What could a world free of sexism look like? We will introduce different methods used by educators and activists for interrupting and re-directing moments of sexism and racism toward the world we want to live in. Real-life examples of sexist behavior will be discussed. Whether you are a female looking for ways to respond (verbally or behaviorally) to sexist behavior or microaggressions, or whether you are a male looking for resources to support your female colleagues, THIS IS THE EVENT TO ATTEND! 

Registration is required to we can have an accurate headcount. To register for the event, click here!

Viewing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) Documentary 

When: Monday, April 1st from 5:00pm to 6:30pm in Conference Room A
Description:  The Women in Science series will be showing the documentary 'RBG' detailing the life and career of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court and the second female justice (of four) to be confirmed. At the end of the film (6:30pm) we will have an optional 15-30 minutes for discussion. Snacks and beverages will be provided, but feel free to bring snacks of your preference. 

All are encouraged to attend regardless of gender!

Registration is encouraged so that we can have an accurate headcount. To register for the event, click here!

Discussion for Men: How to be an Ally 

When: Thursday, April 18th from 12:00 to 1:30pm in Conference Room A

Speakers: Emma Boyd, Andrew Lithen, Kelsey Biddle

Description: The Women in Science team invites all men of the Martinos Center to join us for our next session, "Discussion for Men: How to be an Ally." Allies are men that take on active roles in promoting gender equality within our community. We take initiative in recognizing the barriers that women often face in social life and the workplace as well as the privileges we often take for granted. We actively use our privilege to promote gender equality and inclusion in our daily lives. Please join us in exploring how you can be an ally and help contribute to a strong, inclusive environment at the Martinos Center and the community at large. We will discuss how to identify inequality, engage in creating change, and encourage others to also take responsibility. Coffee and cookies will be provided, feel free to bring your lunch!

Registration is encourages so that we can have an accurate headcount. To register for the event, click here!

Postcard Party!

When: Monday, May 6th from 12:30 to 2:00pm in Conference Room A

Description: Please consider stopping by Conference Room A next Monday, the 6th, anytime between 12:30pm-2pm for postcards and chocolate-covered strawberries. The Women in Science team will have themed postcards that you can write a message on and we will mail or deliver for you. Take this time to show your gratitude and support for a women in science in your life - this could be a current or past mentor, colleague, lab member, etc. We hope to see you there!

Past Event Descriptions 

Fall 2018

LGBTQ Social

Description: The Martinos Center is holding its first ever LGBTQ Social! This event is sponsored by the Women in Science seminar series. There will be networking, beer, wine, cider, and appetizers for all in attendance. This event supports the Martinos Center’s welcoming and affirming environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer employees, patients, families, and friends. Being the first event of its kind, this will be a fantastic opportunity to build a community here at the center. Please email Matthew Scott (mscott24@mgh.harvard.edu) and Emma Boyd (eboyd2@mgh.harvard.edu) with any further questions.
 

Mentoring Lunches

Mentors: Maria Mody, Lilla Zollei, Monica Wey, Maria Franceschini

Description: Round-table lunches where established faculty members provide advice to small groups of other female faculty/postdocs, as well as graduate students and RAs. Registration is required, is limited to 16 people, is only open to women and is first come, first served. You will receive a confirmation from us if you secured a spot. Lunch will be provided for this event!

If you secured a spot: You will be randomly assigned to a group of 4 people. Each group of 4 will be assigned one female faculty member as a mentor. Halfway through the lunch, groups will rotate so you can meet with a second mentor. Please bring your own questions and discussion topics, and try to arrive 10 minutes early to choose your lunch.

Discussion of Gender Role in the Workplace for Men

Discussion Facilitators: Doug Greve, Robert Barry

Description: Gender (in)equality concerns ALL genders! Men, as a group typically under-represented in gender-equality discourse, we need your participation and support in order to bring about institutional and social change. We want to hear your voices- if you're unsure how this series is relevant to you, if you have some questions you'd like to talk through, or if you'd just like to hear your colleagues thoughts on gender roles and related topics, please join. 

AAUW Work Smart - Negotiation Workshop for Women

Check in will begin 30 minutes before the workshop.

Speakers: AAUW Boston Staff

Description: Women working full time in the United States typically are paid just 80 percent of what men are paid, a gap of 20 percent — and it’s even wider for black women, Latinas, and Native women.

Attend this FREE two-hour salary negotiation workshop to learn how to confidently and successfully negotiate your salary and benefits packages. In this workshop, you’ll gain confidence in your negotiation style through facilitated discussion and role-playing and learn

  • How to identify and articulate your personal value
  • How to develop an arsenal of persuasive responses and other strategies to use when negotiating
  • How to conduct objective market research to benchmark a target salary and benefits
  • About the wage gap, including its long-term consequences

You will also have an opportunity to practice your negotiation.

AAUW Work Smart in Boston, an initiative of AAUW and the Mayor's Office of Women's Advancement, is a FREE grassroots salary negotiation workshop program that helps close the gender wage gap by empowering women to evaluate, articulate, and negotiate their value in the job market.

"How to Respond to Sexism in the Moment"

Speakers: Mariko Dodson and staff from Boston Mobilization

Description: In this workshop we will explore sexism as a system of oppression using experimential education. How have our lives been shaped by our identities? What role do power and privilege play in the workplace? How do you envision a world shaped along lines of gender-based justice? What could a world free of sexism look like? We will introduce different methods used by educators and activists for interrupting and re-directing moments of sexism and racism toward the world we want to live in. Real-life examples of sexist behavior will be discussed. Whether you are a female looking for ways to respond (verbally or behaviorally) to sexist behavior or microaggressions, or whether you are a male looking for resources to support your female colleagues, THIS IS THE EVENT TO ATTEND! 

Networking Social

Description: Come join us at 5pm, November 13th for drinks, appetizers, and conversation in the Center atrium. Here you will have an opportunity to meet fellow Women in Science attendees- in particular, the fantastic women of the Martinos Center! Please take this opportunity to connect with them and learn more about their science. This event is open to everyone who has attended at least one Women in Science event this fall, to female faculty at our center, and to anyone who has contributed to the development of this series in some way. If you'd like to bring an outside guest for networking purposes, please send an email to eboyd2@mgh.harvard.edu. Registration is required so that we can have an accurate headcount.

 

Spring 2018

"Barriers to Women in Science"

** This event is being held in association with the Martinos Center Career Week **

Speaker: Phyllis Carr, MD

Description: Dr. Phyllis Carr is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Internal Medicine specialist at MGH Women's Health Associates. She will discuss and provide materials on barriers to advancement for women, pathways to leadership, compensation equity, mentoring/coaching and sponsorship, career flexibility and work-life balance. This event is being co-hosted by the Martinos Center Career Week. Feel free to bring your lunch!

"Implicit (and explicit) Gender and Racial Bias in STEM"

Speaker: Jessica Remedios, PhD

Description: Women, and particularly women of color, are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, both in the numbers in which they pursue degrees and careers in STEM, and also in the rates at which they earn employment, tenure, and recognition for their work. Research in Psychology describes two “pathways” to gender and racial disparities in STEM: biased recruitment tactics and biased retention strategies. In this talk I will present empirical research on these reasons for underrepresentation with the aim of starting a discussion about potential remedies. The first part of the talk will show how associations between boys/men and science, formed in early childhood, perpetuate a   masculine culture within some STEM fields that makes women feel unwelcome. The second part of the talk will show that women in STEM fields encounter implicit and explicit stereotypes linking their gender to scientific incompetence. I will conclude by describing research investigating ways to make STEM environments more inclusive.

Discussion on "Implicit (and explicit) Gender and Racial Bias in STEM"

Led by: Emma

Description: This discussion group will review the main arguments and research findings presented by Dr. Jessica Remedios on gender and racial bias in STEM (above). This discussion group is designed for those who have questions or would like to discuss the topic of bias and how it relates to our Center. Those who did not attend Monday's lecture on these topics are still welcome to join. Feel free to bring your lunch!

Salary & Promotion Panel

Panelists:

  • Lisa Shin, PhD

  • Ona Wu, PhD

  • Maria Mody, PhD

  • Scott Gazelle, MD, MPH, PhD

Description: This is a Q&A panel focused on the following topics: interviewing, hiring process, salary, promotion process, and negotiation. Our panelists will aim to give insight on relevant institutional policies related to salaries and promotions, and will share their personal insight/experiences. Attention will be given to the question of how gender plays a role in any of these five major topics, and to what extent.

Work/Life Balance Discussion Group

Led by: Emma

Description: This is a round table style discussion on truths and myths of work/life balance for women. We will talk about whether a work/life balance is achievable for the women in our Center,  what that balance looks like, and what resources we need to achieve it. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions they would like to discuss.

Mentor Lunches

***Lunch will be provided!***

Mentors for lunch #1: Gaelle Desbordes, Eva Ratai, Maria Mody, Jean Augustinack

Mentors for lunch #2: Anastasia Yendiki, Julie Price, Yi-Fen Yen, Lilla Zollei

Description: Round-table lunches where established female faculty members provide advice to small groups of other female faculty/postdocs, as well as graduate students and RAs. We will only be able to accept a small number of attendees for these two events. You will receive a confirmation from us if you secured a spot.

If you secured a spot: You will be randomly assigned to a group of 5 people. Each group of 5 will be assigned one female faculty member as a mentor. Halfway through the lunch, groups will rotate so you can meet with a second mentor. Please bring your own questions and discussion topics.

"How to Respond to Sexism in the Moment"

***Coffee and cookies will be provided!***

Speaker: Mariko Dodson and staff from Boston Mobilization

Description: In this workshop we will explore sexism as a system of oppression using experimential education. How have our lives been shaped by our identities? What role do power and privilege play in the workplace? How do you envision a world shaped along lines of gender-based justice? What could a world free of sexism look like? We will introduce different methods used by educators and activists for interrupting and re-directing moments of sexism and racism toward the world we want to live in. Real-life examples of sexist behavior will be discussed. Whether you are a female looking for ways to respond (verbally or behaviorally) to sexist behavior or microaggressions, or whether you are a male looking for resources to support your female colleagues, THIS IS THE EVENT TO ATTEND!

Concluding Discussion

From 12-2pm we will hold a concluding discussion where we will talk about how we would like to continue this effort for the future. If you have input or would like to be involved, please try to attend. It is alright if you cannot stay for the whole time. If you cannot attend but would like to give input, send an email to Emma at eboyd2@mgh.harvard.edu.

Speaker bios

Phyllis Carr is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Internal Medicine specialist at MGH Women's Health Associates. She obtained her MD from Harvard Medical School and has been in practice for over 20 years. Dr. Carr is well known for her support of women's health issues, and has authored numerous publications on gender disparities in academic medicine.

Jessica Remedios is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the Social Identity and Stigma Lab (SISL) at Tufts University. She received her Ph.D. in experimental social psychology from the University of Toronto in 2012. Dr. Remedios' research aims to understand the impact of stereotypes on stigmatized group members under conditions of complexity.

Lisa Shin received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology at Dartmouth College and a PhD in Psychology at Harvard University. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School and has been a faculty member at Tufts since 1998. Dr. Shin's research involves examining brain function and cognitive processing in patients with anxiety disorders, especially posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Maria Mody is a Principal Investigator and Assistant Professor of Radiology at the MGH Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. She has a PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences and works at the intersection of speech and language deficits in autism and dyslexia using neuroimaging (MRI/DTI/MEG). More recently her research has been probing molecular and genetic mechanisms to inform potential interventions in neurodevelopmental disabilities. She is also the editor of a new book on the Neural Mechanisms of Language (2017; NY:Springer).

Ona Wu is an Associate Professor in Radiology (Harvard Medical School) and Associate Neuroscientist (Massachusetts General Hospital). She is a faculty member at the MGH Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging and the Director of the Clinical Computational Neuroimaging group at MGH. She received her PhD in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 2002. The research goals of her group are to improve the diagnosis, prognosis and management of patients with brain injury. Her group's research concentrates on the development of machine-learning algorithms which combine multiple MRI modalities and clinical data to assess tissue injury and recovery and ultimately patient outcomes. In addition to algorithm development, their research involves the refinement of advanced MRI data acquisition and analysis and development and validation of quantitative imaging biomarkers.

G. Scott Gazelle M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School and Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. He serves as Director Emeritus of the MGH Institute for Technology Assessment and Director of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Program in Cancer Outcomes Research Training. He is also Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Associate Vice-Chair for Research in the MGH Department of Radiology. Dr. Gazelle received his B.A. from Dartmouth College, his M.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health and his Ph.D. in Health Policy from Harvard University. Dr. Gazelle is nationally and internationally known for his leadership role in the development and evaluation of radiofrequency tumor ablation, and more generally for his research evaluating the benefits, costs, and appropriate use of new medical technologies.

Other Events Within MGH

Lucy F. Squire, MD Lecture "The Sound of Breaking Glass"

The Women in Radiology Steering Committee cordially invites you to the first Lucy F. Squire, MD Lecture entitled "The Sound of Breaking Glass," by Dr. Carolyn Meltzer, the William P. Timmie Professor and Chair of Radiology at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Squire was a pioneer in radiology education and was the first female radiology resident at MGH. Introductory remarks about Lucy F. Squire, MD will be given by Dr. Theresa McLoud.  

Date & Time:
Tuesday, September 25th
 
Lecture: 5:30 PM, Ether Dome, Bullfinch Building, 4th floor
 
Reception: 6:30 PM, Trustees Room, Bullfinch Building, 2nd floor
 
All are welcome to attend.
 

Other Events Outside of MGH

Check back for more events in the future!

Our Team

Emma Boyd
Chair
eboyd2@mgh.harvard.edu

Emma is a Research Technician in the MGH Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging. Emma acquires and analyzes ex vivo brain MRI data, both structural and diffusion, at a variety of resolutions (100um-1mm) and field strengths (9.4T, 7T, 3T, 1.5T). She also analyzes in vivo data for studies focused on clinical populations, notably infant studies of developmental dyslexia. In addition to brain imaging acquisition and analysis, Emma assists with the testing and development of FreeSurfer, as well as teaching members of the neuroimaging research field how to use the software at local and international courses.

 

Viviana Siless
Chair
vsiless@mgh.harvard.edu

Viviana Siless is a research fellow at the Laboratory of Computational Neuroimaging and Rosas Lab. She obtained a M.S. in Computer Science in 2010 from the University of Argentina, and her Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2014 from the University Paris-XI at INRIA/CEA, France. Her research focuses on developing software for the analysis of diffusion MRI in brain white matter, such as AnatomiCuts, a tool for analyzing full brain deterministic tractography.  She is part of the Boston Adolescent Neuroimaging of Depression and Anxiety project, an arm of the Human Connectome Project focused on diseased populations. In 2013 she participated in Infinite pluriElles, a French initiative to promote women in science. She is a member of the post-doctoral division committee at MGH.

 

Paige Sparks
Event Coordinator
kpsparks@bwh.harvard.edu

Paige is a Senior Clinical Research Coordinator working with Dr. Reisa Sperling in the MGH Department of Neurology on the Harvard Aging Brain Study. Before joining the HABS team in 2015, she graduated from Boston University with a BA in Political Science. She is interested in early detection in Alzheimer’s Disease, as well as racial differences in cognition and pathology related to the disease.

 

Lyssa Manning
Event Coordinator
lmanning6@mgh.harvard.edu

Aubryn is a Clinical Research Coordinator working with Dr. Reisa Sperling in the MGH Department of Neurology. Lyssa received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology ('14) and Master of Science in Neuroscience ('17) degrees from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She has worked in aging and neuroimaging for three years prior to joining the Harvard Aging Brain study and is excited to continue learning about early detection of cognitive decline in pathological aging with the excellent team here at HABS.

 

Leah Morgan
Financial Coordinator
lmorgan6@mgh.harvard.edu

Leah is a Research Technician in the MGH Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging. Leah acquires and analyzes ex vivo brain MRI data, both structural and diffusion, at a variety of resolutions (100um-1mm) and field strengths (7T, 3T, 1.5T). She also analyzes in vivo data for studies focused on clinical populations. In addition to brain imaging acquisition and analysis, Leah also assists with the testing and development of FreeSurfer, as well as teaching members of the neuroimaging research field how to use the software at local and international courses.

 

Kelsey Biddle

Outreach Coordinator

Gender Justice Researcher

kdbiddle@bwh.harvard.edu

Kelsey D. Biddle is a Clinical Research Coordinator in the Department of Psychiatry at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Kelsey performs clinical assessments for the Harvard Aging Brain Study and assists with the research of Dr. Donovan. Kelsey’s research investigates social relationships, levels of social activity and cognitive outcomes in healthy older adults. She is an advocate for creating connections across generations and is interested in developing interventions to decrease social isolation and preserve health and function in older adults.

 

Edmarie Guzman-Velez
Outreach Coordinator
eguzman-velez@mgh.harvard.edu

Dr.Guzmán-Vélez joined the MGH Familial Dementia Neuroimaging Lab as a postdoctoral fellow in September 2016. She completed her doctoral training in clinical psychology at the University of Iowa and internship in neuropsychology at the Boston VA. Her research has focused on examining the dissociation between declarative memory and emotions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Her current interests in the lab include investigating, 1) cognitive tests that are sensitive to the earliest brain changes in AD; 2) changes in functional connections in the preclinical and prodromal stages of AD, and how these relate to cognition and pathology burden; and 3) how greater aerobic fitness may modify the course of AD and the underlying mechanisms (e.g. neuroinflammation).

 

 

Aubryn Samaroo
Intersectionality Advocate
asamaroo1@mgh.harvard.edu

Aubryn is a Clinical Research Coordinator working with Dr. Reisa Sperling and Dr. Dorene Rentz in the MGH Department of Neurology. Aubryn graduated from Brown University in 2017 with a double major in Cognitive Neuroscience and Education Studies. She is from Michigan. She is interested in investigating new tests and technologies to study early cognitive decline in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias.

 

Caroline Magnain
Event Promotion and Series Branding 
cmagnain@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

Dr. Magnain is an Instructor in Radiology and part of the MGH Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging and the Optics Division. Caroline is working on 3D high resolution human brain imaging using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Part of her study is to identify anatomical brain regions (Brodmann areas) by examining optical property changes in the cortical layers. The tissue samples are then registered to high resolution MRI imaging data to look for potential MR markers of the boundaries identified in OCT. The boundaries observed using OCT are validated with histology/immunochemistry. Additionally, Caroline is using OCT to perform high resolution tractography, which she compares to ex vivo MRI diffusion data.

 

Paulita Lara
Event Promotion and Series Branding
pslaramejia@mgh.harvard.edu

Description

 

Morgan Fogarty
Website and Electronic Resources
mfogarty1@mgh.harvard.edu

Morgan is a Research Technician in the MGH Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging. Morgan acquires and analyzes ex vivo brain MRI data, both structural and diffusion, at a variety of resolutions (100um-1mm) and field strengths (7T, 3T, 1.5T) as well as with OCT. In addition to brain imaging acquisition and analysis, Morgan also assists with the testing and development of FreeSurfer, as well as teaching members of the neuroimaging research field how to use the software at local and international courses.

 

Aina Frau-Pascual

Website and Electronic Resources

Gender Justice Researcher

afraupascual@mgh.harvard.edu

Aina is a Research Fellow in Radiology, and part of the MGH Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging. She is currently working on the development of tools and diffusion and functional MRI techniques to model indirect human brain connections and assess their potential for being Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. She works closely with Drs. Iman Aganj and Bruce Fischl.

 

Andrew Lithem
Website and Electronic Resources
alithen@mgh.harvard.edu

Description